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I don't even like sockmonkeys

Colombian, lesbian, rad fem, vegan, amateur artist

I'm Ana and I love teenage superheroes with a passion

The Animal Rescue Site The Rainforest Site The Hunger SiteThe Literacy Site

The Breast Cancer Site swag Online game to end hunger
Sep 20 '14

jeou:

THE MOTTO

(Fuente: badgirlsclubgifs)

Sep 20 '14

shreksforthememories:

food should be free. water should be free. housing should be free. power, fuel, electricity should be free. basic necessities should be free.

the idea of “people should have to work for a living” carries the implication that some people deserve to die

Sep 20 '14

First thing’s first: Iggy isn’t the realest.
That’s what many keen observers may have, in fact, correctly gleaned from Nicki Minaj’s candid remarks about “authenticity” during her BET Awards acceptance speech. But the rapper has repositioned her statements, saying the media “put words in her mouth” and that her spirited quips weren’t at all a diss to Iggy Azalea. Instead, according to Minaj’s tweets on Wednesday, she spoke out to "motivate” up-and-coming female emcees to keep pushing the pen to the paper, and to challenge a male-dominated industry.
But it still sounds as though Minaj is throwing at least a few drops of shade.
Minaj tweeted, “I fell in love with Lauryn Hill b/c I knew she was the author behind those amazingly profound and articulated songs on the MisEducation … It’s the same reason I have a different level of respect for Missy. I know she’s a writer and a producer. Women MUST aspire for more.” Her words respectfully acknowledged two legendary black female rappers, creating what’s known as a “compliment sandwich” as she addressed Iggy Azalea, who has been said to not write her own rhymes—perhaps one of the most cardinal offenses within rap music.
“I’ve congratulated Iggy on the success of ‘Fancy,’ publicly. She should be very proud of that. All the women nominated should b proud,” she said, notably without any of the high praise given to Lauryn and Missy’s lyrical genius, before closing with why she will keep encouraging women to write.
In case you weren’t following, Nicki’s mention of Iggy’s “success” is the meaty criticism sandwiched between the golden buns. It’s also a formula many other writers and music critics adopt while discussing Iggy’sdemerits as a female rapper and cultural appropriator.
Depending on who you ask, including an offbeat piece from Forbes, rap’s “Fancy” new starlet is now dominating the entire genre, especially since she’s now the female rapper ever with the longest reign atop the Billboard Hot 100—a record previously held by Lil’ Kim and a peak never reached by even Minaj’s pop-crossover hits “Starships” and “Super Bass.”
AlthoughForbes eventually backpedaled, it’s a sentiment about Iggy that now resonates with many—and has even made Nicki sneer. That’s why many other black female artists and emcees such as Rah Digga, K. Michelle, and Azealia Banks go out of their way to express disapproval of Azalea’s antics.
At the BET Awards earlier this week, Azalea was the only other person nominated who could’ve even possibly beat out Nicki Minaj for Best Female Hip-Hop Artist. Given the recent trend of white artists dominating Rap/Hip-Hop and R&B categories at virtually every major awards show, it wouldn’t have surprised anyone if Iggy Azalea had bested Minaj, let alone at a ceremony that expressly celebrates African-American music and culture.
But it seems as though every time conversations crop up about Iggy Azalea, Macklemore, or even Robin Thicke’s appropriating ways, the vocal critics get panned—mainly by white people—as a horde of racists for “attacking” their participation in black artforms, no matter how intrinsically rooted they are to black experiences.
The upset usually reaches a fever pitch because white rappers like Iggy Azalea get away with appropriating Blackness, ripping off everything but the social and institutional indignities rooted in the black experiences that lead to the creation of hip-hop.
But, more often than not, the conversation delves into a minefield of these potential impasses:
1. “So what if they rap or sing like black people?”
Contrary to most media narratives, black people don’t all speak the same way. Our sayings, dialects, and even vocal dynamics may bear common roots, but are heavily influenced by life experiences, education and regional differences. Even in hip-hop, artists like Trina, Eve and Da Brathave exhibited a variety styles and flow. .
Even though Macklemore arguably uses and abuses the white privilegehe’s fully aware of having within hip-hop and popular music, he at rhymes using the vocal dynamics derived from his lived reality. Iggy Azalea’snatural speaking voice is actually the sugary-sweet, rural Australian accent she grew up with—not the grungy, Southern “blaccent” she adopts for the sake of rapping.
2. “You’re just hating on them because they’re more successful.”
The real question here isn’t about the hard numbers, but even those figures currently side against Iggy. A look at the numbers tells a completely different story. Although Iggy Azalea is the queen of the Billboard’s Hot 100, a throne many black female emcees have never gotten the chance to sit upon, she has yet to match their sales figures and business ventures. Queen Latifah doesn’t rap as much anymore, but her career of more than 20 years includes talk shows, TV series such as Living Single, product endorsement deals, acting roles and even an Academy-Award nomination for “Chicago.” As for Nicki Minaj, her debut of “Pink Friday” moved 375,000 copies in its first week, compared to 52,000 for Iggy’s “The New Classic.”
But fans should instead ask about and, eventually, acknowledge the conditions that allow white rappers like Iggy Azalea to reach such stratospheric levels of popularity. More specifically, Iggy Azalea’s public image merits examination as one that mainstream white American audiences consume voraciously at the expense and exclusion of her black counterparts. She makes money and breaks records, largely in part, because she’s a blonde, white, foreign woman who’s doing the new “hip” thing, even if her act may be a bit recycled.
3. “You’re racist for suggesting that white people can’t participate in rap.”
Sure, she can. However, there’s a difference between appreciating an artform and adding to its richness and appropriating a minstrel-like caricature that’s composed of various tropes. With Azalea, it’s the obsession over her curvaceous cakes, the “blaccent,” and an overidentification with the abject poverty disproportionately encountered by black folks, as seen in her video for “Work.”
In the entertainment business, almost all of the stars have highly manicured public fronts that have been calculated for their profitability. It applies to rap, but only to a certain extent. Perhaps if Azalea were instead centering her raps on topics such as growing up in Mullumbimby, Australia, and doing it with her own accent, maybe we’d be looking at her differently—or not at all.
4. “But they had help from a black artist, so that gives them credibility.”
T.I. deserves all the credit for mentoring Iggy, but that’s not where his culpability ends.
Just as he profits from the offensive nature and history of Native appropriation via his Grand Hustle label and merchandise, T.I. does the same by enabling white artists like Robin Thicke and Iggy Azalea to rip off blacks with impunity.
Last fall, T.I., Thicke, and Pharrell preemptively sued Marvin Gaye’s family over “Blurred Lines,” after the late-singer’s estate claimed the trio ripped off the sound of Gaye’s hit “Got To Give It Up.” Gaye’s family eventually countersued all parties involved and, earlier this year, reached a settlement with music publisher Sony/ATV. The other battles continue.
T.I. has a similar relationship with Iggy Azalea, often helping her fend offscorn about her lack of authenticity. While discussing the infamousForbes article in an interview, T.I. said, “She is running this moment in hip-hop, but to say running [hip-hop]; that’s a very broad statement. Although I feel eventually that is the outcome.”
5. “Black people should be flattered that someone’s singing and appreciates their music.”
The success and vitality of black-created genres doesn’t depend on white people performing the music, especially when it’s been pillaged and stolen for decades. As noted in in considerable detail over at Racialicious, various white icons and their hits—including Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog”, Madonna’s “Vogue” and, yes, “We Can’t Stop” by Miley Cyrus, to name a few—all are culprits. Despite the history cultural theft, black artists like Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson and Jay-Z have smashed Billboard records, sold out concert venues worldwide and influencing many white artists who acknowledge and truly appreciate the genres—artists likeAdele, Duffy and Sam Smith.
If nothing else, at least their voices and lyrics are theirs.
Derrick Clifton is a Chicago-based journalist and writer primarily covering race, gender and LGBT issues, and their intersections with politics. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, or visit derrickclifton.com for more information on his work.

First thing’s first: Iggy isn’t the realest.

That’s what many keen observers may have, in fact, correctly gleaned from Nicki Minaj’s candid remarks about “authenticity” during her BET Awards acceptance speech. But the rapper has repositioned her statements, saying the media “put words in her mouth” and that her spirited quips weren’t at all a diss to Iggy Azalea. Instead, according to Minaj’s tweets on Wednesday, she spoke out to "motivate” up-and-coming female emcees to keep pushing the pen to the paper, and to challenge a male-dominated industry.

But it still sounds as though Minaj is throwing at least a few drops of shade.

Minaj tweeted, “I fell in love with Lauryn Hill b/c I knew she was the author behind those amazingly profound and articulated songs on the MisEducation … It’s the same reason I have a different level of respect for Missy. I know she’s a writer and a producer. Women MUST aspire for more.” Her words respectfully acknowledged two legendary black female rappers, creating what’s known as a “compliment sandwich” as she addressed Iggy Azalea, who has been said to not write her own rhymes—perhaps one of the most cardinal offenses within rap music.

I’ve congratulated Iggy on the success of ‘Fancy,’ publicly. She should be very proud of that. All the women nominated should b proud,” she said, notably without any of the high praise given to Lauryn and Missy’s lyrical genius, before closing with why she will keep encouraging women to write.

In case you weren’t following, Nicki’s mention of Iggy’s “success” is the meaty criticism sandwiched between the golden buns. It’s also a formula many other writers and music critics adopt while discussing Iggy’sdemerits as a female rapper and cultural appropriator.

Depending on who you ask, including an offbeat piece from Forbes, rap’s “Fancy” new starlet is now dominating the entire genre, especially since she’s now the female rapper ever with the longest reign atop the Billboard Hot 100—a record previously held by Lil’ Kim and a peak never reached by even Minaj’s pop-crossover hits “Starships” and “Super Bass.”

AlthoughForbes eventually backpedaled, it’s a sentiment about Iggy that now resonates with many—and has even made Nicki sneer. That’s why many other black female artists and emcees such as Rah DiggaK. Michelle, and Azealia Banks go out of their way to express disapproval of Azalea’s antics.

At the BET Awards earlier this week, Azalea was the only other person nominated who could’ve even possibly beat out Nicki Minaj for Best Female Hip-Hop Artist. Given the recent trend of white artists dominating Rap/Hip-Hop and R&B categories at virtually every major awards show, it wouldn’t have surprised anyone if Iggy Azalea had bested Minaj, let alone at a ceremony that expressly celebrates African-American music and culture.

But it seems as though every time conversations crop up about Iggy Azalea, Macklemore, or even Robin Thicke’s appropriating ways, the vocal critics get panned—mainly by white people—as a horde of racists for “attacking” their participation in black artforms, no matter how intrinsically rooted they are to black experiences.

The upset usually reaches a fever pitch because white rappers like Iggy Azalea get away with appropriating Blackness, ripping off everything but the social and institutional indignities rooted in the black experiences that lead to the creation of hip-hop.

But, more often than not, the conversation delves into a minefield of these potential impasses:

1. “So what if they rap or sing like black people?”

Contrary to most media narratives, black people don’t all speak the same way. Our sayings, dialects, and even vocal dynamics may bear common roots, but are heavily influenced by life experiences, education and regional differences. Even in hip-hop, artists like TrinaEve and Da Brathave exhibited a variety styles and flow. .

Even though Macklemore arguably uses and abuses the white privilegehe’s fully aware of having within hip-hop and popular music, he at rhymes using the vocal dynamics derived from his lived reality. Iggy Azalea’snatural speaking voice is actually the sugary-sweet, rural Australian accent she grew up with—not the grungy, Southern “blaccent” she adopts for the sake of rapping.

2. “You’re just hating on them because they’re more successful.”

The real question here isn’t about the hard numbers, but even those figures currently side against Iggy. A look at the numbers tells a completely different story. Although Iggy Azalea is the queen of the Billboard’s Hot 100, a throne many black female emcees have never gotten the chance to sit upon, she has yet to match their sales figures and business ventures. Queen Latifah doesn’t rap as much anymore, but her career of more than 20 years includes talk shows, TV series such as Living Single, product endorsement deals, acting roles and even an Academy-Award nomination for “Chicago.” As for Nicki Minaj, her debut of “Pink Friday” moved 375,000 copies in its first week, compared to 52,000 for Iggy’s “The New Classic.”

But fans should instead ask about and, eventually, acknowledge the conditions that allow white rappers like Iggy Azalea to reach such stratospheric levels of popularity. More specifically, Iggy Azalea’s public image merits examination as one that mainstream white American audiences consume voraciously at the expense and exclusion of her black counterparts. She makes money and breaks records, largely in part, because she’s a blonde, white, foreign woman who’s doing the new “hip” thing, even if her act may be a bit recycled.

3. “You’re racist for suggesting that white people can’t participate in rap.”

Sure, she can. However, there’s a difference between appreciating an artform and adding to its richness and appropriating a minstrel-like caricature that’s composed of various tropes. With Azalea, it’s the obsession over her curvaceous cakes, the “blaccent,” and an overidentification with the abject poverty disproportionately encountered by black folks, as seen in her video for “Work.”

In the entertainment business, almost all of the stars have highly manicured public fronts that have been calculated for their profitability. It applies to rap, but only to a certain extent. Perhaps if Azalea were instead centering her raps on topics such as growing up in Mullumbimby, Australia, and doing it with her own accent, maybe we’d be looking at her differently—or not at all.

4. “But they had help from a black artist, so that gives them credibility.”

T.I. deserves all the credit for mentoring Iggy, but that’s not where his culpability ends.

Just as he profits from the offensive nature and history of Native appropriation via his Grand Hustle label and merchandise, T.I. does the same by enabling white artists like Robin Thicke and Iggy Azalea to rip off blacks with impunity.

Last fall, T.I., Thicke, and Pharrell preemptively sued Marvin Gaye’s family over “Blurred Lines,” after the late-singer’s estate claimed the trio ripped off the sound of Gaye’s hit “Got To Give It Up.” Gaye’s family eventually countersued all parties involved and, earlier this year, reached a settlement with music publisher Sony/ATV. The other battles continue.

T.I. has a similar relationship with Iggy Azalea, often helping her fend offscorn about her lack of authenticity. While discussing the infamousForbes article in an interview, T.I. said, “She is running this moment in hip-hop, but to say running [hip-hop]; that’s a very broad statement. Although I feel eventually that is the outcome.”

5. “Black people should be flattered that someone’s singing and appreciates their music.”

The success and vitality of black-created genres doesn’t depend on white people performing the music, especially when it’s been pillaged and stolen for decades. As noted in in considerable detail over at Racialicious, various white icons and their hits—including Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog”, Madonna’s “Vogue” and, yes, “We Can’t Stop” by Miley Cyrus, to name a few—all are culprits. Despite the history cultural theft, black artists like Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson and Jay-Z have smashed Billboard records, sold out concert venues worldwide and influencing many white artists who acknowledge and truly appreciate the genres—artists likeAdele, Duffy and Sam Smith.

If nothing else, at least their voices and lyrics are theirs.

Derrick Clifton is a Chicago-based journalist and writer primarily covering race, gender and LGBT issues, and their intersections with politics. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, or visit derrickclifton.com for more information on his work.

Sep 20 '14
Angel Haze - Same Love

theescapegoats:

feministsongs:

Angel Haze - Same Love

"At age thirteen, my mom knew I wasn’t straight
She didn’t understand but she had so much to say
She sat me on the couch, looked me straight in my face
And said you’ll burn in hell or probably die of AIDS”

Pansexual rapper exchanges Mackelmore’s no-homo lyrics for a freestyle about her experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Move the fuck over, Macklemore.

Sep 20 '14

henrrywinter:

inksplattersandearlyhours:

I think one of the reasons the Harry Potter Epilogue was so poorly received was because the audience was primarily made up of the Millennial generation.

We’ve walked with Harry, Ron and Hermione, through a world that we thought was great but slowly revealed itself to be the opposite. We unpeeled the layers of corruption within the government, we saw cruelty against minorities grow in the past decades, and had media attack us and had teachers tell us that we ‘must not tell lies’. We got angry and frustrated and, like Harry, Ron and Hermione, had to think of a way to fight back. And them winning? That would have been enough to give us hope and leave us satisfied.

But instead. There was skip scene. And suddenly they were all over 30 and happy with their 2.5 children.

And the Millennials were left flailing in the dust.

Because while we recognised and empathised with everything up to that point. But seeing the Golden Trio financially stable and content and married? That was not something our generation could recognise. Because we have no idea if we’re ever going to be able to reach that stage. Not with the world we’re living in right now.

Having Harry, Ron and Hermione stare off into the distance after the battle and wonder about what the future might be would have stuck with us. Hell, have them move into a shitty flat together and try and sort out their lives would have. Have them with screaming nightmares and failed relationships and trying to get jobs in a society that’s falling apart would have. Have them still trying to fix things in that society would have. Because we known Voldemort was just a symptom of the disease of prejudice the Wizarding World.

But don’t push us off with an ‘all was well’. In a world about magic, JK Rowling finally broke our suspension of disbelief by having them all hit middle-class and middle-age contentment and expecting a fanbase of teenagers to accept it.

Also. Since when was ‘don’t worry kids, you’re going to turn out just like your parents’ ever a happy ending? Does our generation even recognise marriage and money and jobs as the fulfillment of life anymore? Does our generation even recognise the Epilogue’s Golden Trio anymore?

       (x)

Sep 20 '14
Sep 20 '14

floozys:

parental figure: “sit like a lady”

me:

image

Sep 20 '14
anishinaabequay:

Steven Paul Judd (Choctaw/Kiowa).

anishinaabequay:

Steven Paul Judd (Choctaw/Kiowa).

(Fuente: pinterest.com)

Sep 20 '14

onehappyvegan:

People always say I have so much self control being a vegan but I don’t think the two are related at all. I have no self control and I’ll down a whole bucket of vegan ice cream in a minute. It doesn’t take self control to not want to eat the flesh or biproducts of a dead tortured innocent animal.

Sep 20 '14

dothecreeep:

memewhore:

vrisktorias-sekret:

all-good-usernames-are-taken:

WHAT A LITTLE SHIT

i lOVE HOW HE JUST HESITATES FOR A SECOND

THEN HE JUST

REBELLION”

I’ve never yet been able to resist reblogging this

My cat does this

(Fuente: dauntlesschristinas)

Sep 20 '14

marauders-groupie:

Ginevra Weasley + The Hogwarts years

Ginevra Weasley was very punk rock, thank you very much. She was so punk rock that she was penpals with He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named at age of eleven. 

Sure, Harry was great (after all, had she not had a crush on him since she first met him?), but this princess could battle the dragons on her own.

Honestly, it was just that a lot of things suddenly became easier after she got out of the Chamber alive and well, and nothing much bothered her after that.

She still picked the lock on the toolshed and secretly rode on a broomstick until she was accepted in the team, and she still loved having a butterbeer mustache, but she no longer had her eyes only for Harry and she no longer cared about her family’s views of what a young lady should do. 

No, the only thing she grew to care about was the fact that anything was possible if you had enough nerve. 

Sep 20 '14
Sep 20 '14
e-brat:

postracialcomments:

quietlyexhale:

nishnasty:

#Repost from @junglebarbiejulia FULL STORY. On the night of August 10 2013 I went to DC for my birthday to go to “Park Place”, an upscale restaurant. Upon my arrival at the entrance, at 11:30pm, before going to stand in the very long line I went to ask a patrolling officer where a nearby restroom was and before I could utter the words, I was met with an elbow and a right punch to my face. I was instantly knock out. My police report (which has changed numerous times this year) say I was arrest and processed at 1:50 am which is 2 hours that I was unaccounted for. I was left on the floor and when I woke up I was bleeding in multiple places with drag marks on my toes, my wrist were cut by the cuffs, the back of my head and arms were lumpy. The officers wouldn’t tell me why I was in jail and I overheard them saying what should we charge her with? We can’t say domestic, we don’t know who she is with. After pleading and begging to go to the hospital, I was met with more hostility before they finally let me go to the hospital the next days upon my release I had a rape kit done because I don’t know any thing that happened to me while knocked out and it came back positive for semen. They sent messages from my phone while I was detained. Internal Affairs came and confiscated my clothing (they never returned them) and they stole my rape kit. As of today I am facing charges for fighting a bouncer outside of the Lima Club, I was never there and its 5 minutes away from Park driving, also 5 officers that responded after I punched the manager to I was apparently Mike Tyson because when I woke up in jail I had the strength and gumption to fight some more officers in there. When the video was requested both clubs said they lost them. They follow me and stalk my home to this day, I have caught DC police trying to get in my home when they thought I had left, even the Baltimore cops help protect them, one in the rape department even asked me out on a date while my face was still battered. I have been trying to tell my story on IG only to find that police officers or this hired by then have been spamming my hashtag #justiceforjulia with blasphemous pictures. Please share her story.

postracialcomments

BOOST!!!!!
This is the video from the stills posted!!!
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=679216132168166&set=vb.159600104129774&type=2&theater
Spread this around!!!

i live 5 minutes away from dc……. i want to fucking vomit…..

e-brat:

postracialcomments:

quietlyexhale:

nishnasty:

#Repost from @junglebarbiejulia FULL STORY. On the night of August 10 2013 I went to DC for my birthday to go to “Park Place”, an upscale restaurant. Upon my arrival at the entrance, at 11:30pm, before going to stand in the very long line I went to ask a patrolling officer where a nearby restroom was and before I could utter the words, I was met with an elbow and a right punch to my face. I was instantly knock out. My police report (which has changed numerous times this year) say I was arrest and processed at 1:50 am which is 2 hours that I was unaccounted for. I was left on the floor and when I woke up I was bleeding in multiple places with drag marks on my toes, my wrist were cut by the cuffs, the back of my head and arms were lumpy. The officers wouldn’t tell me why I was in jail and I overheard them saying what should we charge her with? We can’t say domestic, we don’t know who she is with. After pleading and begging to go to the hospital, I was met with more hostility before they finally let me go to the hospital the next days upon my release I had a rape kit done because I don’t know any thing that happened to me while knocked out and it came back positive for semen. They sent messages from my phone while I was detained. Internal Affairs came and confiscated my clothing (they never returned them) and they stole my rape kit. As of today I am facing charges for fighting a bouncer outside of the Lima Club, I was never there and its 5 minutes away from Park driving, also 5 officers that responded after I punched the manager to I was apparently Mike Tyson because when I woke up in jail I had the strength and gumption to fight some more officers in there. When the video was requested both clubs said they lost them. They follow me and stalk my home to this day, I have caught DC police trying to get in my home when they thought I had left, even the Baltimore cops help protect them, one in the rape department even asked me out on a date while my face was still battered. I have been trying to tell my story on IG only to find that police officers or this hired by then have been spamming my hashtag #justiceforjulia with blasphemous pictures. Please share her story.

postracialcomments

BOOST!!!!!

This is the video from the stills posted!!!

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=679216132168166&set=vb.159600104129774&type=2&theater

Spread this around!!!

i live 5 minutes away from dc……. i want to fucking vomit…..

Sep 20 '14

do-you-have-a-flag:

jurisdon:

3lm19:

GUYS PLEASE PAY ATTENTION TO HOW THEY ARE ATTACKING AND RAIDING MUSLIM HOMES IN AUSTRALIA

the police are attacking muslims in their homes in the middle of the night, arresting women in their beds, men in the morning, attacing and humiliating us all

life is getting scary here for the muslims 

I didn’t believe this but herearesomesources

Summary: Apparently they were trying to find local ISIS supporters and foil an alleged plot to carry out what PM Tony Abbot called “demonstration killings” to show that ISIS isn’t just located in the Middle East. They claim to have intelligence that informed this decision to raid. The raids were carried in 12 suburbs and involved around 900 police officers. They arrested 15 people during the raids, but have only released the details of one prisoner who had direct contact with the Australian Muslim who they know is an active recruiter for ISIS. 

To me this sounds like an incredibly overblown response to an issue that could’ve been solved by one arrest. Please keep in mind that the Washington Post, the last source, is more conservative. Since these raids have happen, protests have erupted all over Australia and the Muslim Australian community is understandably fucking pissed. Don’t let this go unnoticed.

this is what i knew would happen once they raised the “threat level” to “high”
it’s also a case of the government using islamophobia to pump up a sense of fear (despite the threat being basically non existent here) that they’re using to distract from the actual issues of the shitty things they’re doing to our country

Sep 20 '14

dashconballpit:

she has draWINGS BY HER CHILDREN SEWN INTO HER WEDDING DRESS this is the cutest ofmg

(Fuente: vaginawoolf)